Reorganisation of Parishroots

As some of you may have noticed, Parishroots is having a make-over for the New Year. All the articles are being reorganised by book rather than county. This will make it obvious what type of articles are available and should give a shorter categories list. Each article is also tagged with the parish name. If you click the tag it will take you to all the articles for that parish. To make it easier to find the parish you are interested in you will be able to use the menus on the left of the page. Choose the country, then county for the parish you are interested in. Each County Page will have a list of parishes which link to the tag page for that parish and thus will list all articles for that parish.

Clun Shropshire – The History and Topography of Shropshire 1820

Q. Describe Clun.

A. Clun is a small decayed town, or rather village, five miles from Bishop’s Castle, deriving its name from the neighbouring river. It is remarkable merely for the ruins of its castle, once an extensive and strong fortress, erected by William Fitz-Alan, in the reign of Henry III. Clun gives the title of baron to the Duke of Norfolk. Continue reading Clun Shropshire – The History and Topography of Shropshire 1820

Bishops Castle Shropshire – The History and Topography of Shropshire 1820

Q. What is Bishop’s Castle ?

A. Bishop’s Castle is a neat market town, so called from the Bishops of Hereford having anciently a castle here; it is situated on the river Clun, 20 miles from Shrewsbury, and 160 from London, has a population of 1367 persons, and a market on Friday. Continue reading Bishops Castle Shropshire – The History and Topography of Shropshire 1820

Shrewsbury Shropshire – The History and Topography of Shropshire 1820

Q. What is the situation of Shrewsbury?

A. Shrewsbury, the capital of the county, is situated on a peninsula, formed by the river Severn which nearly surrounds it. It is 160 miles from London, contains a population of 16,000 persons, and has a market on Wednesday and Saturday.

Q. What was the origin of Shrewsbury, and from whence did it derive its name?

A. Shrewsbury is supposed to have owed its origin to the destruction of the neighbouring Roman station Uriconium, some time in the fifth century. When taken by the Saxons, they called it Scrobbesbyrig, or the Hill of Shrubs: this became in process of time Shrobbesbury and Shrewsbury.

Q. What is the general appearance of Shrewsbury ? Continue reading Shrewsbury Shropshire – The History and Topography of Shropshire 1820

Battlefield Shropshire – The History and Topography of Shropshire 1820

Q. What is Battlefield?

A. Battlefield, about four miles north of Shrewsbury, is the scene of the great battle between Henry IV. and Henry Percy, son to the Earl of Northumberland. Victory declaring for the King, in consequence of the death of Percy, he erected a church on the spot in testimony of his gratitude, but it is now in a ruinous condition. Under a tumulus near the churchyard, the slain in that memorable engagement lie buried. Continue reading Battlefield Shropshire – The History and Topography of Shropshire 1820

Drayton, or Market Drayton, Shropshire – The History and Topography of Shropshire 1820

Drayton, or Market Drayton, a clean little town, watered by the river Terne.

Q. Give some particulars of Drayton.

A. Drayton is 160 miles from London, and 18 From Shrewsbury; has a population of 3370 persons, a market on Wednesday, once the largest in the district, but now much diminished – a manufacture of paper, and another of horse hair chair-bottoms, &c. The church is ancient, but presents nothing remarkable. A bloody battle was fought near this town, between the adherents of the house of York and those of the house of Lancaster, with little advantage on either side.  Continue reading Drayton, or Market Drayton, Shropshire – The History and Topography of Shropshire 1820

Heath, Shropshire Poll Book 1865

Below are the names of those that voted in the election of July 1865 between Col. The Hon. P. E. Herbert, Sir Baldwin Leighton, Bart., and R. Jasper More, Esq.

Poll Book of the Election, July 1865 for the Southern Division of Shropshire.

Ludlow Polling District

Heath, Chapelry of

2413 Edwards Richard, see 1904

2414 Hanson Edwin

2415 Miles Samuel

2416 Morgan The Rev. George, see 4161 Continue reading Heath, Shropshire Poll Book 1865

Halford, Shropshire Poll Book 1865

Below are the names of those that voted in the election of July 1865 between Col. The Hon. P. E. Herbert, Sir Baldwin Leighton, Bart., and R. Jasper More, Esq.

Poll Book of the Election, July 1865 for the Southern Division of Shropshire.

Ludlow Polling District

Halford, Parish of

2408 Give George Herbert Windsor Windsor see 40

2409 Cox John

2410 Everall Thomas

2411 Handley William

2412 Marston Richard

Greet, Shropshire Poll Book 1865

Below are the names of those that voted in the election of July 1865 between Col. The Hon. P. E. Herbert, Sir Baldwin Leighton, Bart., and R. Jasper More, Esq.

Poll Book of the Election, July 1865 for the Southern Division of Shropshire.

Ludlow Polling District

Greet, Parish of

2404 Berrington John

2405 Bradney Joseph Christopher

2406 Corfield Thomas

2407 Mason Richard

Diddlebury, Shropshire Poll Book 1865

Below are the names of those that voted in the election of July 1865 between Col. The Hon. P. E. Herbert, Sir Baldwin Leighton, Bart., and R. Jasper More, Esq.

Poll Book of the Election, July 1865 for the Southern Division of Shropshire.

Ludlow Polling District

Diddlebury, Parish of

2374 Bowen Edward

2375 Chatham John

2376 Clinton Frederick Ashley

2377 Cornewall Herbert Somerset Continue reading Diddlebury, Shropshire Poll Book 1865

Culmington, Shropshire Poll Book 1865

Below are the names of those that voted in the election of July 1865 between Col. The Hon. P. E. Herbert, Sir Baldwin Leighton, Bart., and R. Jasper More, Esq.

Poll Book of the Election, July 1865 for the Southern Division of Shropshire.

Ludlow Polling District

Culmington, Parish of

2354 Anslow Alexander

2355 Bach Richard

2356 Bassett Edward

2357 Botfield William Continue reading Culmington, Shropshire Poll Book 1865

Cold Weston, Shropshire, Poll Book 1865

Below are the names of those that voted in the election of July 1865 between Col. The Hon. P. E. Herbert, Sir Baldwin Leighton, Bart., and R. Jasper More, Esq.

Poll Book of the Election, July 1865 for the Southern Division of Shropshire.

Ludlow Polling District

Cold Weston, Parish of

2353 Keysell Thomas, see 4158

Clee St. Margaret, Shropshire Poll Book 1865

Below are the names of those that voted in the election of July 1865 between Col. The Hon. P. E. Herbert, Sir Baldwin Leighton, Bart., and R. Jasper More, Esq.

Poll Book of the Election, July 1865 for the Southern Division of Shropshire.

Ludlow Polling District

Clee St. Margaret, Parish of

2332 Bennett Edward

2333 Burton John

2334 Cooper Abraham Continue reading Clee St. Margaret, Shropshire Poll Book 1865

Ashampstead Berkshire Cassey History Gazetteer and Directory of Berkshire and Oxfordshire 1868

Is a small village and parish, 10 miles west from Reading, 9 from Wallingford, and 45 from London, in the hundred of Moreton, union of Bradfield, and diocese of Oxford. The church of St. Clement is a plain structure, which was repaired in 1849. The living is a vicarage, annual value £80, in the alternate gift of the Rev. William Sykes, and the trustees of the late Rev. Charles Simeon. Here is a school, supported by voluntary subscriptions. The Baptists and Primitive Methodists have each a small chapel here. Continue reading Ashampstead Berkshire Cassey History Gazetteer and Directory of Berkshire and Oxfordshire 1868

Ardington Berkshire Cassey History Gazetteer and Directory of Berkshire and Oxfordshire 1868

Is a parish and village in the hundred and union of Wantage, and diocese of Oxford, two miles from the Wantage road station on the Great Western Railway, which crosses the Berks and Wilts Canal in this parish. The church of the Holy Trinity is in the Early English style. The living is a vicarage, in the patronage of Christ Church, Oxford. Continue reading Ardington Berkshire Cassey History Gazetteer and Directory of Berkshire and Oxfordshire 1868

Arborfield Berkshire Cassey History Gazetteer and Directory of Berkshire and Oxfordshire 1868

Is a small village and parish, 5 miles from Reading, and 3 from Oakingham, in the hundred of Sonning, union of Wokingham, and diocese of Oxford. The church of St. Bartholomew is a handsome building, in the Early English style. The chancel windows are of stained glass: there are two memorial windows to members of the Towgood family : the church was built at a cost of upwards of £4,000, to which Sir William Brown, Bart., of Liverpool, was the principal contributor. The living is a rectory, annual value £388, with residence, in the gift of Lord Braybrooke. Arborfield Hall, the seat of Captain Thomas Hargreaves, J. P., is pleasantly situated on the banks of the river Loddon, with park and grounds. There is a mixed National school. Continue reading Arborfield Berkshire Cassey History Gazetteer and Directory of Berkshire and Oxfordshire 1868

Appleton with Eaton Berkshire Cassey History Gazetteer and Directory of Berkshire and Oxfordshire 1868

Appleton is a parish, in the hundred of Ock, union of Abingdon, and diocese of Oxford, situated about 5½ miles north-west from Abingdon, and 7 south-west from Oxford, bounded by the Thames on the west. The church of St. Lawrence is a plain structure, with nave, chancel, and square embattled tower containing ten very fine musical bells, which are deservedly much admired. There is an excellent band of change ringers. In the interior are several memorials to the families of the present and former lords of the manor. Continue reading Appleton with Eaton Berkshire Cassey History Gazetteer and Directory of Berkshire and Oxfordshire 1868

Appleford Cassey History Gazetteer and Directory of Berkshire and Oxfordshire 1868

Is a village and chapelry belonging to Sutton Courtney, but independent of it as relates to its parochial affairs; it is 3 miles south-east from Abingdon, and 55 from London, in the hundred of Ock, union of Abingdon, and diocese of Oxford. The chapel is a plain little old building. The living is a chapelry, annexed to Sutton Courtney vicarage, joint annual value £148, in the gift of the Dean and Canons of Windsor. Here is a free school endowed by Mr. Edmond Bradstock, who gave a messuage and 36 acres of land in perpetuity for its support; 20 poor boys are taught, 13 out of Sutton and 7 out of Appleford. There is a charity of £11 a yearfor the poor. Charles Eyston, Esq., is lord of the manor and chief landowner. Continue reading Appleford Cassey History Gazetteer and Directory of Berkshire and Oxfordshire 1868

Aldworth Cassey History, Gazetteer and Directory of Berkshire and Oxfordshire 1868

Is a small village and parish, 12 miles west from Reading, and 47 from London, in the hundred of Compton, union of Wantage, and diocese of Oxford. The church of St. Peter is an ancient fabric, of Mixed Gothic architecture, with tower, nave, south aisle, and chancel: the interior contains several monuments, on which lie the effigies of the family of De La Beche, which is supposed to have come over to England with William the Norman, and some of whom have been buried in this church; these figures, nine in number, were very much mutilated in Oliver Cromwell’s time: the foundation of a castle was laid by this family in the neighbourhood, upon the site of which now stands a farmhouse: in the churchyard is a very ancient yew tree, which measures nine and a half yards round the trunk, and is supposed to be older than the church. Continue reading Aldworth Cassey History, Gazetteer and Directory of Berkshire and Oxfordshire 1868

Aldermaston Cassey History, Gazetteer and Directory of Berkshire and Oxfordshire 1868

Aldermaston is a pleasant village, parish and railway station, 46 miles by rail and 49 by road from London, 10 from Reading, and 9 from Newbury, in the hundred of Theale, union of Bradfield, and diocese of Oxford. About 1½ miles from the village is Aldermaston Wharf, on the river Kennett, where a considerable business is done in timber, &c., also an extensive brewery and malting establishment, the property of W. J. Strange, Esq. Continue reading Aldermaston Cassey History, Gazetteer and Directory of Berkshire and Oxfordshire 1868

Croft Herefordshire Lascelles & Co. Directory & Gazetteer of Herefordshire 1851

Croft is a very small Parish N.N.W. from Leominster.—The Church is equally small. The Rev. Joseph Davies, Rector; Mr. Benjamin Addis, Clerk. Service—11 a.m. and 3 p.m., alternately.

Clergy And Gentry.

Davies Wm. T. K., Esq., Magistrate, Croft Castle

Edwards Rev. Joseph, Rector, Rectory

Source: Lascelles & Co. Directory & Gazetteer of Herefordshire; Swan Brothers, 45 Ann Street, Birmingham; 1851.

Yarpole Herefordshire Lascelles & Co. Directory & Gazetteer of Herefordshire 1851

Yarpole is a small Parish four-and-a-half miles N.N.W. from Leominster.

The Church is small, with square tower. The Rev. Joseph Edwards, Vicar; Mr, Edwin Spencer, Churchwarden; Mr. Enoch Chamberlain, Clerk. Service –11 a.m. and 3 p.m., alternately.

Clergy And Gentry.

Beale Rev, Theodore, Birchill

Dunn Thomas, Esq., M.D., Magistrate, Birchill

Davies Mrs., High Wood Continue reading Yarpole Herefordshire Lascelles & Co. Directory & Gazetteer of Herefordshire 1851

Holme Lacey Herefordshire Lascelles & Co. Directory & Gazetteer of Herefordshire 1851

Holme Lacey, or Holm Lacey, a large Parish six miles S.E. of Hereford. Holme Lacey House, the seat of Sir E. F. Scudamore Stanhope, Bart., is a noble mansion surrounded by a fine park.

The Church, which stands on the banks of the River Wye, is an old edifice, with two aisles and a large square tower, containing eight bells. In the Church there are several fine monuments, erected to the memory of the ancient Scudamore family. The gallery and organ was erected in the year 1833, by Lady Stanhope, and presented to the Parish. The Rev. Francis Lewis, Vicar; the Rev. Selo Brigstock, Curate; Mr. Francis Ward, Clerk. Service—11 a.m. and 3 p.m.  Continue reading Holme Lacey Herefordshire Lascelles & Co. Directory & Gazetteer of Herefordshire 1851

Lugwardine Herefordshire The Parliamentary Gazetteer of England and Wales 1848

Lugwardine, a parish in the hund, of Radlow, union and county of Hereford; 3 miles east by north of Hereford, on a large branch of the Wye. Living, a vicarage, with the perpetual curacies of Little Dewchurch, Hentland, Llangarran, and St. Weonards, It is exempt from visitation, being in the peculiar jurisdiction and patronage of the dean and chapter of Hereford: it is rated at £22 7s. 1d.; gross income £980. Continue reading Lugwardine Herefordshire The Parliamentary Gazetteer of England and Wales 1848

Ludford Herefordshire & Shropshire The Parliamentary Gazetteer of England and Wales 1848

Ludford, a parish partly in the hund. of Wolphy. union of Ludlow, Hereford, and partly in that of Muuslow, Salop; ½ mile south of Ludlow, on the river Teme. Living, a perpetual curacy in the archd. of Salop and dio. of Hereford; rated at £11, returned at £105; gross income £105. Patron, in 1835, E. L. Charlton, Esq. Here is an hospital for six poor persons, with a revenue of £63, founded in 1672 by Sir J. Charlton. Acres 2,920. Houses 61. A. P. £1,846. Pop., in 1801, 253; in 1831, 284. Poor rates, in 1838, £238 1s.

Source: The Parliamentary Gazetteer of England and Wales; A Fullarton & Co. Glasgow; 1848.

Lucton Herefordshire The Parliamentary Gazetteer of England and Wales 1848

Lucton, a parish in the hund, of Wolphy, union of Leominster, county of Hereford; 5 miles north-west of Leominster, and north-east of the Lug. Living, a perpetual curacy in the archd. and dio. of Hereford; returned at £40; gross income £61. Patrons, the governors of Lucton school. The free-school here was founded and endowed by John Pierrepont in 1708: income, in 1836, £1,215 0s. 4d. The boys to be elected to this school, which, in extent of income and general importance, is the principal one in the county, are, by the rules and orders for its government, to be taken from the parishes, hamlets, and townships of Lucton, Croft, Yarpole, Bircher, Luston, Eyton, Kingsland, Shobdon, and Aymestrey, all in Herefordshire; and at the time of their election, must be able to read distinctly the Lord’s Prayer, the Creed, the Ten Commandments, and a chapter of the New Testament. Continue reading Lucton Herefordshire The Parliamentary Gazetteer of England and Wales 1848

St. Briavels Gloucestershire The Parliamentary Gazetteer of England and Wales 1851

Briavel’s (St.), a parish in the hund. of St. Briavell’s, county of Gloucester; 7 miles north of Chepstow, on the eastern bank of the river Wye. Living, a curacy annexed to the vicarage of Lydney. The church is a small cruciform edifice of great antiquity. There are two daily schools in this parish. A weekly market was formerly held here under a charter of Edward II., who likewise conferred on the inhabitants the right of passing toll-free all over the kingdom, — a privilege now obsolete. The market has also fallen into disuse. Continue reading St. Briavels Gloucestershire The Parliamentary Gazetteer of England and Wales 1851

Bricklehampton Worcestershire The Parliamentary Gazetteer of England and Wales 1851

Bricklehampton, a chapelry in the parish of St. Andrew, Pershore, upper division of the hund. of Pershore, county of Worcester; 3½ miles south-east by south of Pershore. Living, a curacy annexed to the vicarage of St. Andrew, Pershore. The great and small tithes, the property of the lay-impropriator and vicar, were commuted in 1774. There is a daily school here. Pop., in 1801, 102; in 1831, 156. Houses 35. Acres 810. A. P. £1,477. Poor rates, in 1837, £63.

Source: The Parliamentary Gazetteer of England and Wales; A Fullarton & Co. Glasgow; 1851.

Bridge Sollers Herefordshire The Parliamentary Gazetteer of England and Wales 1851

Bridge-Sollers, a parish in the hund. of Grimsworth, union of Weobley, county of Hereford; 6 miles west-north-west of Hereford: on the banks of the river Wye, over which there is a ferry here. Living, a discharged vicarage in the archd. and dio. of Hereford; valued at £3 10s., and rated in the parliamentary returns at £102; gross income £100. Patron, in 1835, Sir J. G. Cotterell, Bart. Pop., in 1801, 53; in 1831, 71. Houses 12. Acres 740. A. P. £1,159. Poor rates, in 1837, £104.

Source: The Parliamentary Gazetteer of England and Wales; A Fullarton & Co. Glasgow; 1851.

Bridstow Herefordshire The Parliamentary Gazetteer of England and Wales 1851

Bridstow, a parish in the lower division of the hund. of Wormelow, union of Ross, county of Hereford; 1 mile west-north-west of Ross, on the western bank of the river Wye. Living, a vicarage in the archd. and dio. of Hereford; valued at £9 3s. 11½d., rated in the parliamentary returns at £55 17s. 6d.; gross income £302; in the patronage of the bishop of Hereford. There are two daily schools in this parish. In the vicinity is Wilton castle, now a picturesque ruin covered with ivy, but formerly the baronial residence of the lords Grey de Wilton. Pop., in 1801, 471; in 1831, 596. Houses 116. Acres 1,870. A. P. £4.141. Poor rates, in 1837 £326.

Source: The Parliamentary Gazetteer of England and Wales; A Fullarton & Co. Glasgow; 1851.

Brierley Hill Staffordshire The Parliamentary Gazetteer of England and Wales 1851

Brierley-Hill, a chapelry in the parish of Kingswinford, northern division of the hund, of Seisdon, county of Stafford; 2 miles north-north east of Stourbridge, in the vicinity of the Stafford and Birmingham canal. Living, a perpetual curacy in the archd. of Stafford and dio. of Lichfield and Coventry, not in charge; rated in the parliamentary returns at £55 17s. 6d.; gross income £97. Patron, in 1835, the Rev. Dr. Penfold. In the vicinity are many collieries and extensive iron-works where steam-boilers are made. Pop. is returned with the parish.

Source: The Parliamentary Gazetteer of England and Wales; A Fullarton & Co. Glasgow; 1851.